Doñana delights – Remaining Balance

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The Parque Nacional de Doñana itself is one of Europe’s most important wetland reserves and a major site for migrating birds. It is an immense area; the park itself and surrounding Entorno de Doñana cover over 1,300 sq km in the provinces of Huelva, Sevilla and Cádiz.

Doñana is well known for its enormous variety of bird species, either permanent residents, winter visitors from north and central Europe or summer visitors from Africa. There are three distinct kinds of ecosystem here: the marismas, the Mediterranean scrublands and the coastal mobile dunes with their beaches.

It is also one of the last strongholds of the Iberian Lynx – a beautiful feline that now holds the dubious honour of being the world’s most endangered cat.  If luck is on our side, we may see this awe-inspiring creature on our travels.

Description

With a fascinating range of habitats to visit, including Stone Pine woodland, reedbeds, rice paddies, open grassland and heathland, freshwater pools and coastal sand dunes and of course the famous marshes, it’s no wonder Coto Doñana attracts such a fantastic variety of birds.  We’ll take you to explore these habitats from our base in El Rocío, a lovely town with sandy streets that overlooks the lagoon, river and marshlands of the Doñana.

The Parque Nacional de Doñana is one of Europe’s most important wetland reserves and a major site for migrating birds. It is an immense area; the park itself and surrounding parque natural or Entorno de Doñana amount to over 1,300 sq km in the provinces of Huelva, Sevilla and Cádiz.

Doñana is well known for its enormous variety of bird species, either permanent residents, winter visitors from north and central Europe or summer visitors from Africa. The park as a whole comprises three distinct kinds of ecosystem: the marismas, the Mediterranean scrublands and the coastal mobile dunes with their beaches.